Visual Language Tutorial 2


Transcript from the ‘Visual Language and Grammar: Squares’ movie
Welcome to the second episode of Visual Language and Grammar. In part two we are going to be looking at squares and how through use of colour, scale, structure and cropping we can alter our visual perception.

Structure
To structure these exercises we’ll be using a square measuring 150mm subdivided into 15 units of 10mm

Exercise One
In this exercise you’ll need a grey square of 150mm. Two black squares measuring 50mm and two white squares measuring 50mm. The effect of laying the white square over the black is that the white square appears to be floating above a black hole. Our visual perception is of three dimensional space on what Edward Tufte calls ‘the flatlands of the glowing rectangle’ which is your screen. If we start with a white square and overlay a black square our perception is that there is a light glowing behind the black square. Here’s that exercise again in full.

Exercise Two
For this exercise you will need a 150mm grey square, a 50mm black square, a 50mm white square and two 30mm yellow squares. The yellow on the black is more visible than on the white. This is because of the minimal contrast between the yellow and the white background. We will repeat the first part of the exercise again, grey square, black square, white square, but now with two 30mm blue squares. The effect is the opposite to that of the yellow squares. There is very little contrast between the blue and the black background but increased contrast when on the white background.

Colour and readability
This is an important point when considering visibility of graphics and readability of typography. Yellow on white not so readable, Blue on white more readable. Blue on black not very readable, yellow on black very readable. Hey guys chill out, there is a happy medium where blue and yellow can co-exist in harmony on green. Even the crickets like it.

Gestalt Theory: The Principle of Continuity
We interrupt the broadcast to bring you an official warning. If you take two square and overlay them, although the eye can’t see the continuing edges, it will make sense of the situation and see the resulting image as two squares one on top of the other. The brain helps simplify visual messages. We don’t suddenly perceive the overlaying squares as a new 8 sided object. This is know as Gestalt theory and is the principle of continuity.

Exercise Three: Random Squares
For the purpose of health and safety can you now stand back from the screen. I’ll be throwing some sharp edged squares on screen and those corners could have your eye out. You going to need a 60mm square, a 90mm square and a 30 mm square. Now arrange the squares on the 15 unit grid we’ve been using. Do this randomly disregarding scale.

Exercise Four: Squares and Scale
Let’s consider scale. Small to large. This is almost like digital smoke. Again small to large. This is like the square is advancing towards us. Large to small. And the square is walking away from us. Again large to small. This is like a tornado spiraling down.

Exercise Five: Freeform Compositions
Try some dynamic freeform compositions using black and white squares proportioned to the grid. Consider various techniques such as overlapping or altering the proportions between black and white areas.

Exercise Six: Cropping Squares
Taking our 15 unit grid divide it into three vertically and horizontally. Threes into 15 makes 3 divisions of 5 units each. Crop black rectangles to different sizes and place them within the individual squares of the 3×3 structure. Consider whether the square diminishes progressively and what the developing relationship between each square is. The visual communication course I ran had students from all round the world. Hi guys! One student questioned my assumption of reading left to right and top to bottom in this exercise. In recognition of this I dedicate this next version to the students I’ve had the good fortune to teach. For this next one, I’m pressing the randomiser button.

Conclusion
When making your compositions look above and below and from side to side to see whether there are significant alignments occurring. I think it’s important there are but hey that’s just my theory. Oh no! See you next time!


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