Details Part 4

Dashes and rules
There are three types of dashes: hyphen dashes, en rules (the width of a capital N) and em rules (the width of a capital M). I advise the use of hyphen dashes and en rules. A hyphen dash is achieved by typing a dash and an en rule is achieved by typing a dash while holding the option key (on a Mac). One uses an en rule to link phrases in a sentence – such as this – a word space is left either side of the en rule. Whether one uses an en rule or a hyphen dash to indicate a period of time is a question of style eg 7-9pm or 7 – 9pm or 7–9pm or 7 – 9pm. I would generally recommend a hyphen dash with no space either side.

Marks of omission
Marks of omission (ellipses) are achieved by striking the semicolon key while holding down the option key (on a Mac), such as this…Do not set three full points.

French spacing
It is a secretarial convention to use French spacing. This is putting a double word space after a full point – this is not correct typographic practice – a single word space after a full point is enough.

Bullet points
It is common practice to use bullets (circles), squares, diamonds or dingbats to emphasis points made in a text list. A small floating bullet point is achieved by typing 8 while holding down the option key (on a Mac). If you want a bullet point that is the same as the cap height, type a lowercase L and change it to a Zapf dingbat, to achieve an x-height bullet do the same and reduce its size until it measures the same as a lowercase o.

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